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Page: 01 - Getting started with the OpenSim GUI
Please, download the OpenSim model attached to this page and start exploring the model components using the OpenSim GUI.
Page: 02 - Setup Your Environment
Please download the HelloOpenSim.cpp and CMakeList.txt files attached to this page and use them to create the starting Visual Studio 2010 solution.
Page: 03 - Define Bodies and Joints
Copy the PelvisLeftThighCreateWalkingModelAndEnvironment.cpp file in your Folder and rename it CreateWalkingModelAndEnvironment.cpp Create again your Visual Studio Project Compile the application CreateWalkingModelAndEnvironment Run the application to cre
Page: 04 - Add Contact Geometries
Please find attached the C++ code needed to add contact geometry to the model.
Page: 05 - Add Contact Forces
Please find attached the C++ code needed to add contact forces to the model.
Page: 06 - Add Coordinate Limiting Forces
Please find attached the C++ code needed to add contact limit forces to the model.

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Page: About OpenSim
OpenSim is a software platform for modeling humans, animals, robots, and the environment, and simulating their interaction and movement. OpenSim has a graphical user interface (GUI) for visualizing models and generating and analyzing simulations. The open
Page: Acknowledgements
OpenSim is supported by the National Center for Simulation in Rehabilitation Research (NCSRR) is a National Center for Medical Rehabilitation Research http://ncmrr.org/ funded by NIH research infrastructure grant R24 HD065690. OpenSim is also supported by
Page: Adding New Functionality
There are four new functionalities covered in this guide that you may want to include: Next: Creating a Controller Previous: Creating Your Own Analysis Part Two Home: Scripting and Development | Developer's Guide
Page: Additional Programs
Please refer to Dynamic Walking Challenge: Go the Distance! for additional information about this examples. Program Name Description Related Functions/Classes AddCustomFoot.cpp Adds a custom mesh object to the base model. WeldJoint https://simtk.org/api
Page: Advanced Examples
Page: Advanced Options
A few advanced options are also available through the Advanced… button of the curve creation panel. These include: plot-14.PNG Rectify: Takes the absolute value of the quantity to be plotted Clamp: The values to be plotted are clamped to the range between
Page: Advanced User Workshop August 2012
This workshop covers advanced topics in OpenSim. The workshop is an opportunity to learn more about how OpenSim works "under the hood" and get supervised, hands-on assistance with problems participants bring to the workshop. On the first day, a conceptual
Page: Advanced User Workshop August 2013
This workshop covers advanced topics in OpenSim. The workshop is an opportunity to learn more about how OpenSim works "under the hood" and get supervised, hands-on assistance with problems participants bring to the workshop. On the first day, a conceptual
Page: Advanced User Workshop August 2014
This workshop covers advanced topics in OpenSim. The workshop is an opportunity to learn more about how OpenSim works "under the hood" and get supervised, hands-on assistance with problems participants bring to the workshop. On the first day, participants
Page: Advanced User Workshop February 2013
This workshop covers advanced topics in OpenSim. The workshop is an opportunity to learn more about how OpenSim works "under the hood" and get supervised, hands-on assistance with problems participants bring to the workshop. On the first day, a conceptual
Page: Advanced User Workshop March 2013
This workshop covers advanced topics in OpenSim. The workshop is an opportunity to learn more about how OpenSim works "under the hood" and get supervised, hands-on assistance with problems participants bring to the workshop. On the first day, a conceptual
Page: Advanced User Workshop March 2014
This workshop covers advanced topics in OpenSim. The workshop is an opportunity to learn more about how OpenSim works "under the hood" and get supervised, hands-on assistance with problems participants bring to the workshop. On the first day, participants
Page: Advanced User Workshop March 2015
This workshop covers advanced topics in OpenSim. The workshop is an opportunity to learn more about how OpenSim works "under the hood" and get supervised, hands-on assistance with problems participants bring to the workshop. On the first day, participants
Page: Advanced User Workshop March 2017
This workshop covers advanced topics in OpenSim. The workshop is an opportunity to learn more about how OpenSim works "under the hood" and get supervised, hands-on assistance with problems participants bring to the workshop. On the first day, participan
Page: Akhilesh Jha
Page: Analyses
The Analyze Tool enables you to analyze a model or simulation based on a number of inputs that can include time histories of model states, controls, and external loads applied to the model. A typical use case is to analyze an existing simulation, which ma
Page: API Examples
Using the OpenSim API The Developer's Guide has examples using the API, including: Performing a Simulation - Write a main C++ program (a "tug of war") to create a model and run a forward simulation Creating Your Own Analysis - Write your own Analysis to o
Page: API Upgrade Notes for OpenSim 3.0
API Users should be aware of several changes to the OpenSim API in 3.0: A note to API users with existing plugins and main programs: Both OpenSim libraries and its dependency on Simbody libraries are being simplified and some libraries (such SimTKcpodes.
Page: Associating Data with a Motion
and andOnce a motion is loaded, you can associate additional motion data with the loaded motion or add files to color the muscles in your model. Read more about each feature below: Associate Motion Data If you load a kinematics file for walking, you can a
Page: Authors
OpenSim relies on a large and diverse group of developers and other contributors who have written and tested the software and developed examples and documentation. Current OpenSim Development Team Scott Delp Jennifer Hicks Ajay Seth Ayman Habib Chris Demb
Page: Available SimTK Numerical Methods
Most of the SimTK numerical methods you will need are wrapped by the OpenSim API, so you will not need to access them directly through SimTK. However, many such numerical methods are available if you need them. Some of the most commonly used are: Linear a

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Page: Bakker, Ryan
Page: Balasubramanian Final Presentation
Initial Model - Blooper Successful Model
Page: Balasubramanian Team
Robotics and Human Control Systems Laboratory from Oregon State University Slide1.png
Page: Basic Geometry and Mechanics
In this section, we provide information on several basic SimTK classes, all based on the small Vec and Mat classes described above, that are used in the OpenSim API to deal with geometrical and mechanical concepts: Stations (points) Stations are simply po
Page: Benjamin Binder-Macleod
Page: BIOE-ME 485 Spring 2013
Welcome to the main resource page for BIOE/ME 485: Modeling and Simulation of Human Movement. This course was taught by Prof. Scott Delp at Stanford University in the Spring, 2013 quarter. Variations of this course have been offered by instructors elsewhe
Page: BIOE-ME 485 Spring 2014
Welcome to the main resource page for BIOE/ME 485: Modeling and Simulation of Human Movement. This course was taught by Prof. Scott Delp at Stanford University in the Spring, 2014 quarter. Variations of this course have been offered by instructors elsewhe
Page: Browning Team
Page: Bugs and Updates
This page includes sections for: Bugs, Issues, and Feature Requests We're in the process of updating our bug and feature request trackers, in the meantime, we'll summarize any significant bugs and issues associated with 3.0 on this page. A full list of bu
Page: Building GUI Installer
Installer creation instructions ( as of 08/06/12). Pre-requisites on the Machine Software: VisualStudio 2008+ Pro. CMake 2.8.8 Swig 2.0.4 Netbeans 7.0.1 with JRE 1.6x Resource Hacker (reshacker) used to change the icons in the Netbeans generated installer
Page: Building OpenSim from Source
This document provides instructions for building OpenSim from source. Please note the following: Steps and settings may vary depending on the configuration of your system. Building from source is challenging and, as a non-commercial entity, we have limite
Page: Building the GUI
Prerequisites An installed version of the OpenSim libraries: these are either built from source then installed or downloaded and included with some distribution of OpenSim (that is consistent with the source you're using) If building from source, make su

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Page: Cat Neck Model
A model was constructed to represent the moment-generating characteristics of cat neck muscles. This model consisted of four components: bone geometry, muscle geometry, muscle force-generating parameters, and joint kinematics. The surfaces of the skull, C
Page: Chadwick Final Presentation
Page: Chadwick Team
See also Chadwick Final Presentation. Team members Ed Chadwick, Restorative Medicine Group, Institute for Science and Technology in Medicine, Keele University, Staffordshire, UK. Dimitra Blana, Visiting Researcher, Restorative Medicine, ISTM, Keele, and C
Page: Characteristic Musculotendon Curves
Every Hill-type muscle model uses 4 characteristic curves: Active force length curve Passive force length curve Force velocity curve Tendon force length curve Although most Hill-type muscle models share the same mathematical formulation, most often the ch
Page: Checklist - Evaluating your Simulation
The following is a list of necessary, but not sufficient, questions for evaluating your simulation. You may not be able to answer "yes" to all of these questions, but if the answer is "no", you should be able to provide a plausible explanation to convince
Page: CMBBE Tutorial 2015
OpenSim for Muscle-Driven Multibody Dynamics and Control: Overview and Hands On Example This hands-on tutorial at the 2015 Computer Methods in Biomechanics and Biomedical Engineering (CMBBE) http://cmbbe2015.com/ meeting will provide an example for usin
Page: CMBBE Workshop April 2013
The OpenSim team will run a workshop at the 11th International Symposium on Computer Methods in Biomechanics and Biomedical Engineering http://cmbbe13.sci.utah.edu/ in Salt Lake City, Utah. We invite all CMBBE participants to take part in the OpenSim Work
Page: CMC Settings Files and XML Tag Definitions
This section of the chapter covers how to control CMC execution. The properties governing execution are contained in XML files. The topics covered in this section include: CMC Setup File Execution of the CMC tool is controlled by properties specified in
Page: Collecting Experimental Data
The sections below outline our suggestions for collecting high quality experimental data for use in analyzing human and animal motion and generating simulations. When you start collecting experimental data to analyze motion and generate dynamic simulation
Page: Command Line Utilities
All of the OpenSim Tools are available as command-line utilities that take as input the same setup (or settings) file loaded into or saved from the OpenSim GUI application. For example, to perform Inverse Kinematics from the command line (the Command Prom
Page: Common Scripting Commands
Scripting environments like Matlab, Python and the OpenSim GUI shell allow users to interact with the classes of the OpenSim API (see The OpenSim API). There are many example scripts that are located in the OpenSim scripting folder, available with the dis
Page: Computed Muscle Control
In this section we will cover: Next: Getting Started with CMC
Page: Contributing to the OpenSim Documentation
Help us improve and expand the OpenSim documentation! Once you create an account http://simtk-confluence.stanford.edu:8080/signup.action on confluence, you will be able to make edits to our documentation wiki. The site tracks contributors, so you will get
Page: Contributing to the OpenSim Source Code
Overview The OpenSim project encourages contributions from all researchers. Contributions can come in the form of new models https://simtk.org/home/nmblmodels/ or user-developed plug-ins and other utilities https://simtk.org/home/opensim-utils/. We also p
Page: Contributing Utilities, Extensions, and Plugins
Creating a Project on SimTK The best way to host and share your OpenSim utilities and extensions is to create a project https://simtk.org/register/projectinfo.php on SimTK. You can find more information about creating and managing projects on SimTK.org in
Page: Controller for Maintaining Balance
Team Members Mishel Johns Chris Ploch Contents Goals Create a controller for maintaining balance that uses Induced Acceleration Analysis (IAA). Determine whether controlling only the acceleration of the center of mass (COM) of the model is sufficient to m
Page: Coordinate Controls and Poses
The topics included in this section are: Opening and Closing the Coordinates Window When you launch OpenSim, the Coordinates window is opened in the same panel as the Navigator window. As with other windows in OpenSim, you can move the Coordinates window
Page: Coordinate Systems
The topics covered in this section include: Laboratory Coordinates Every set of (x, y, z) coordinates obtained from a motion capture system is given relative to some coordinate system. Typically, this coordinate system is called the laboratory coordinate
Page: Coordinates Window
The Coordinates window displays all of the joint coordinates (degrees of freedom) in a model, and provides an interface for changing their values. It displays only the coordinates in the current model, which can be set using the Navigator window please vi
Page: Coordinating Muscles for Optimal Jump Performance
A: Run forward dynamic simulations using adjusted excitations Objective: Manually adjust excitations for a single muscle using the Excitation Editor in the OpenSim GUI. Run a forward dynamic simulation using the modified muscle controls. Open the Excitati
Page: Courses
Page: Creating a Controller
Overview In this section, we will add to the tug-of-war example from Chapter 2 by creating a controller that will calculate excitations for the two muscles in the model. The controller we will build computes excitations that naively try to track a desired
Page: Creating a Controller Part One
The steps covered in part one are: Defining the desired trajectory of the model The desired trajectory for the model is a sinusoid that starts out exactly halfway in-between the left and right walls (at the origin z = 0), moves toward the right wall (to z
Page: Creating a Controller Part Two
The steps covered in part two are: Writing the main() To run a forward dynamics simulation using our controller, we can write a main program (as in Chapter 2). Our main program below initializes the model, attaches a controller to the model, and runs a fo
Page: Creating a Customized Actuator
In this exercise, we will create a specific type of actuator that implements a spring with controllable stiffness. The source code and associated files for this example come with the OpenSim 3.0 distribution under the directory: C:\Program Files\OpenSim 3
Page: Creating a Customized Muscle Model
In this section, we will create a muscle model that characterizes fatigue. We will then adapt the example from Chapter 2 to use this new type of muscle model. The resulting source code and associated files for this example come with the OpenSim 3.0 distri
Page: Creating an Actuator Part One
The steps covered in part one are: Creating Your New Class Setting up a working directory Before we examine the code, you will need to set up a working directory. This process is very similar to that described in Section 3.2. Launch CMake. Set the /Custom
Page: Creating an Actuator Part Two
The steps covered in part two are: Using the ControllableSpring (toyLeg_example.cpp) We can now use the ControllableSpring class in an example to see its effects. The toyLeg_example.cpp file we have provided implements a toy leg model that is driven by a
Page: Creating an Optimization
The steps to creating an optimization are: Overview In this section, we will write a main program to perform an optimization study using OpenSim. We will build it up in pieces, starting by programmatically loading an existing OpenSim model. The model will
Page: Creating and Naming 3D Views
You can have as many 3D Views as needed in order to examine your models from various angles. Specific uses of the 3D View windows include: Visualization of objects associated with models, for example, forces and moments applied to a model Visualization o
Page: Creating OpenSim GUI Modules
This content was developed by Hubert Soyer. Creating a module The user interface shipped with OpenSim is built upon the Netbeans Platform. For any GUI specific issues not concerning the access to OpenSim data, the Netbeans Platform documentation is the ri
Page: Creating Plugins
The general idea is that OpenSim is made up of a set of dynamic libraries (dlls on windows). User plugins are built as their own dlls. Each library "registers" a set of classes that it defines and are available for use. By writing a new library and using
Page: Creating Your Own Analysis
In the previous chapter, we created a main program that built a new OpenSim model and performed a forward simulation on it. Another way to utilize the OpenSim API is to use it to create new kinds of objects that are not available in OpenSim. One particul
Page: Creating Your Own Analysis Part One
The steps included in part one are: Build a Body Position Analysis from the Template In this example, you will learn how to a build and use an Analysis. The Analysis itself is a simple one that outputs the position of the center of mass of each body in th
Page: Creating Your Own Analysis Part Two
Build a Body Position, Velocity, and Acceleration Analysis The Analysis from the previous section outputs a body's position. We will now extend it to also output the body's velocity and accelerations. Below, we will show you snippets of the existing code
Page: Curve Creation Panel
The topics covered in this section include: Creating a Curve in the Plotter Curves displayed in the plot panel are either based on data generated by OpenSim (built-in curves) or read from an external source (external curves). The general process for creat
Page: Custom Muscle Model Part One
The steps covered in part one are: The header file (FatigableMuscle.h) We start defining our new muscle model by creating a header file. The model extends the Millard2012EquilibriumMuscle, and will include fatigue effects that are loosely based on the fol
Page: Custom Muscle Model Part Two
The steps covered in part two are: To illustrate the new muscle model, we will modify the tug-of-war example described in Performing a Simulation so that a FatigableMuscle pulls against a Millard2012EquilibriumMuscle. We will run a ten-second forward dyna

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Page: Davidson Team
Page: Debugging a plugin in Visual Studio
Here a a few simple introductory steps to debugging an OpenSim plugin that you may be creating in the OpenSim API using Visual Studio: 1) Visual Studio Load the plug-in project file and Set compile mode to “Release with Debug Info” (RelWithDebInfo) 2)
Page: Debugging in OpenSim
This page contains information and tips on debugging in OpenSim source code. In Visual Studio: To avoid building the entire test suite and just run a particular program/test case, do the following: Insert breakpoints in the program. Right click on the pro
Page: Deformable Lower Extremity Model
We have developed a graphics-based model of the human lower extremity with a "deformable" femur. This model characterizes the geometry of the pelvis, femur, and proximal tibia, the kinematics of the hip and tibiofemoral joints, and the paths of the medial
Page: Deshpande Team
Page: Design of a Fatigable Muscle
Team Members Apoorva Rajagopal Jenny Yong Contents Project Goals With this project, we are hoping to develop a new muscle model which will demonstrate fatigue and have some characteristics of orderly recruitment. The goal of our project is to identify how
Page: Designing a Muscle for a Tug-of-War Competition
A. Explore and edit OpenSim model, storage, and controls files For the following exercise, it is recommended that you have a program capable of recognizing XML tags and folding code (e.g., Notepad++ http://notepad-plus-plus.org/). To teach Notepad++ to re
Page: Dev Week Lecture Slides
OpenSim API Lecture Slides Simbody Lecture Slides Plugin Lecture Slides
Page: Dev Week Notes and Tips
Helpful Links Main OpenSim Support Site: http://www.stanford.edu/group/opensim/support/index.html http://www.stanford.edu/group/opensim/support/index.html OpenSim downloads page, including Beta 3.0 GUI, version 3 (you must be logged in): https://simtk.org
Page: Developer Pages
This section is intended for advanced developers working with the OpenSim source code. Please note before you proceed that it is strongly recommended that you use the API and write plugins. This saves you a great amount of overhead in building and further
Page: Developer's Guide
Guide Overview OpenSim enables users to create computer models of the musculoskeletal system and create dynamic simulations of movement. Individuals who read this guide will learn advanced programming features of OpenSim through illustrations and exercise
Page: Developer's Week July 2012
See the sections below for details about the week's agenda, objectives, building, and how to contribute. We have also created additional pages: Location and Schedule The Developer’s Week will take place in the LKSC center http://goo.gl/maps/vpnz on the St
Page: Developer's Workshop 2016
Welcome to the OpenSim Developer Week Wiki. The information in this Wiki page is intended to help you formulate a project that may both benefit from the OpenSim 4.0 API and is tractable for a one-week workshop. This wiki will be updated regularly so pleas
Page: Documentation To Do List
Documentation Needs Below is a list of the areas where we need additional or improved documentation. Have you found an area where the documentation needs improvement? Send us an email at opensim@stanford.edu mailto:opensim@stanford.edu or post a comment b
Page: Documentation Trademarks and Copyright
SimTK and Simbios are trademarks of Stanford University. The documentation for OpenSim is freely available and distributable under the MIT License http://www.opensource.org/licenses/mit-license.php. Copyright (c) 2009-2016 Stanford University Permission
Page: Dustin Crouch
Page: Dynamic Walker Competition January 2014
Congratulations to the winners: Geena Doak, Matthew Handford, and Alex MacIntosh! You can check out their videos on the OpenSim YouTube Page http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLGBiefGDmSuQ-Z00FRcQpfbgRowMIxPKJ Welcome! We hope you will participate in t
Page: Dynamic Walking Challenge: Go the Distance!
Overview In this exercise you will use the OpenSim software to simulate and design a dynamic walker. As a starting point, you will be given a five-segment dynamic walker model and an arena with obstacles. The goal of the exercise is to maximize the dist
Page: Dynamic Walking Workshop June 2013
The OpenSim team is running a workshop for the Dynamic Walking 2013 Annual meeting http://www.cmu.edu/dynamic-walking/ at Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. This workshop will cover the development and simulation of a passive dynamic w
Page: Dynamics Theory and Publications
Simbody: multibody dynamics for biomedical research Michael Sherman, Ajay Seth, Scott L. Delp Procedia IUTAM 2 (2011) 241–261 Minimal formulation of joint motions for biomechanisms Ajay Seth, Michael Sherman, Peter Eastman, Scott Delp Nonlinear Dynamics

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Page: Evaluating a Musculoskeletal Model
Getting Started: Defining your Research Goals for the Model What results do I need to answer my research question? What elements of a model might these results be sensitive to? In what ranges will my study be conducted and in what ranges has the model bee
Page: Example - Computed Muscle Control
Using Computed Muscle Control Load the Upper Extremity Model. The model (arm26.osim) can be found in the Models folder in the directory where you installed OpenSim. Open Computed Muscle Control Tool. To open the tool, select Compute Muscle Control… from
Page: Example - Estimating Joint Reaction Loads
Matt DeMers gave a webinar demonstrating how to use OpenSim to estimate Joint Reaction Loads. You can find a link to watch the webinar and get the example files here: http://opensim.stanford.edu/support/event_details.html?id=13&title=Webinar-Estimat
Page: Example - Forward Simulation of Stance and Swing
This page is out of date. Please see The Strength of Simulation: Estimating Leg Muscle Forces in Stance and Swing. To present some of the tools and capabilities of OpenSim, we will use a simplified model (leg6dof9muscles.osim) throughout this example. The
Page: Example - Model Editing
Purpose In this example, you will add a body and an actuator to an existing OpenSim model by editing its xml file. You can find the model file (arm26.osim) in the models folder under your OpenSim installation directory. You will need to download an XML e
Page: Examples and Tutorials
There are many tutorials and examples to help you learn how to use OpenSim. The examples listed below move from introductory to more advanced:
Page: Excitation Editor
The Excitation Editor allows you to visually inspect and edit muscle excitation patterns. This can be useful when specifying the input for a forward dynamic simulation (Forward Dynamics) or when examining the outputs of a control algorithm that solves for
Page: Excitation Editor Control Panel
The control panel, located in the bottom-right of the Excitation Editor, allows you to apply operations to selected points in multiple curves, as well as to excitations as a whole. The control panel display reflects these different pieces of functionality
Page: Excitation Tree and Excitation Grid Panel
The topics covered in this section include: Overview The excitation tree and the excitation grid panel are the parts of the Excitation Editor that allow you to control the layout of the muscle excitations (or controls, in general) that are displayed. They
Page: Explanation of Sky Higher Source Code
This page explains some of the specific code related to this project. Some of the code is similar to the example given in the Creating an Optimization http://simtk-confluence.stanford.edu:8080/display/OpenSim/Creating+an+Optimization example that is distr
Page: Exporting and Printing
The topics covered in this section include: Writing Data to External Files You can save the data representing the curves to use at a later time within OpenSim or to import into another application, such as Excel. The saved file uses the .sto format, text

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Page: Fatigable Muscle Code
This page will feature the code necessary to generate and incorporate our fatigable muscle model. During this project, we successfully: Developed a muscle model which incorporates properties of fatigue, orderly recruitment and fiber composition, Created a
Page: Fatigable Runner
Team Members Yu Hsiao Aaron Wayne Contents Motivation There has been an ongoing debate as to which running form is optimal for endurance in long-distance running. Numerous personal accounts for improvement in performance have been reported by everyday ath
Page: Ferris, Lauren
Page: First-Order Activation Dynamics
Summary The activation dynamic model used by OpenSim is a first-order dynamic model based on the work of Thelen (2003) and Winters (1995). OpenSim's implementation was modified by Matthew Millard, Ajay Seth, and Peter Loan to avoid a numerical singularity
Page: Flippin' Felines: Controlling a Cat Model to Land on its Feet
Falling_Cat_Sequence_NPR_horz_border.png Team Members Chris Dembia ssketch Contents To learn how to do this project on your own, check out our Tutorial: Studying the Cat-Righting Reflex. Motivation Between 1998 and 2001, researchers [3] documented 119
Page: Forward Dynamics
In this section we will cover: Next: Getting Started with Forward Dynamics
Page: Forward Dynamics Setup Files and XML Tags
The topics covered in this section include: Setup File and XML Tag Definitions These sample XML files are from the examples/Gait2354_Simbody directory and are part of the OpenSim distribution. Example: XML file for the setup file for forward dynamics <?xm
Page: Forward Simulation of Stance Phase
This page is out of date. Please see The Strength of Simulation: Estimating Leg Muscle Forces in Stance and Swing. Creating a Muscle-Driven Simulation of the Stance Phase of Gait To present some of the tools and capabilities of OpenSim, we will use a simp
Page: Forward Simulation of Swing Phase
This page is out of date. Please see The Strength of Simulation: Estimating Leg Muscle Forces in Stance and Swing. To present some of the tools and capabilities of OpenSim, we will use a simplified model (leg6dof9muscles.osim) throughout this example. The
Page: Frequently Asked Questions
The frequently asked questions about OpenSim are broken up into several categories: Installation and Compatibility Q. Which OpenSim installer should I use? A. As of release 3.3, we provide two Windows only installers (32bit and 64 bit). In general you sh
Page: From the Ground Up: Building a Passive Dynamic Walker Model
Objectives Model development, reduction, and validation are key components in the construction of a meaningful simulation study. In this exercise, you will build a simple model for use in a passive dynamic simulation of walking. For the past few d
Page: Full Body Running Model
The Full Body Running Model is a three-dimensional, 29 degree-of-freedom computer model of the human musculoskeletal system. The model was developed by Samuel Hamner, Ajay Seth, and Scott Delp of Stanford Univeristy. Featuring 92 musculoskeletal actuator
Page: Function Editor
The Function Editor allows you to view and modify the parameters of a model that are functions, such as the force-length curve of a muscle or a joint constraint function. The functions are defined using control points and a function type. You can add, del

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Page: Gait 2392 and 2354 Models
Overview and Authors The Gait2392 and Gait2354 models are three-dimensional, 23-degree-of-freedom computer models of the human musculoskeletal system. The models were created by Darryl Thelen (University of Wisconsin-Madison) and Ajay Seth, Frank C. Ander
Page: Gao, Fan
Page: GCMAS Tutorial 2015
I DOWNLOADED OPENSIM - NOW WHAT? This introductory tutorial at the 2015 Gait and Clinical Movement Analysis Society (GCMAS) https://www.etouches.com/ehome/gcmas2015/general/?& meeting will provide practical tips for getting started with OpenSim. The works
Page: General Modeling and Simulation Publications
OpenSim: Open-Source Software to Create and Analyze Dynamic Simulations of Movement Scott L. Delp, Frank C. Anderson, Allison S. Arnold, Peter Loan, Ayman Habib, Chand T. John, Eran Guendelman, and Darryl G. Thelen IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON BIOMEDICAL ENGINE
Page: Getting OpenSim
OpenSim is available for download from Simtk.org. The following sections describe how you access OpenSim from the website: Log In to SimTK.org Download Installation Program Log In to SimTK.org intro1-1.png Connect your browser to the Simtk.org (https://si
Page: Getting Started as a Developer
This section describes some basic technical background, the prerequisites to build and run the examples in the chapters to follow, and a step-by-step example: Next: Prerequisites Previous: Developer's Guide Home: Scripting and Development
Page: Getting Started with Analyses
The topics covered in this section include: How it Works The Analyze Tool steps in time through a set of input data specifying the state of a model; at each time step, the tool runs a set of analyses on the model. Available analyses include: Kinematics: R
Page: Getting Started with CMC
The purpose of Computed Muscle Control (CMC) is to compute a set of muscle excitations (or, more generally, actuator controls) that will drive a dynamic musculoskeletal model to track a set of desired kinematics in the presence of applied external forces
Page: Getting Started with Forward Dynamics
Given the controls (e.g., muscle excitations) computed by the Computed Muscle Control (CMC) or another approach, the Forward Dynamics Tool can drive a forward dynamic simulation. A forward dynamics simulation is the solution (integration) of the different
Page: Getting Started with Inverse Dynamics
The Inverse Dynamics (ID) Tool determines the generalized forces (e.g., net forces and torques) at each joint responsible for a given movement. Given the kinematics (e.g., states or motion) describing the movement of a model and perhaps a portion of the k
Page: Getting Started with Inverse Kinematics
The Inverse Kinematics (IK) Tool steps through each time frame of experimental data and positions the model in a pose that "best matches" experimental marker and coordinate data for that time step. This "best match" is the pose that minimizes a sum of wei
Page: Getting Started with RRA
The purpose of residual reduction is to minimize the effects of modeling and marker data processing errors that aggregate and lead to large nonphysical compensatory forces called residuals. Specifically, residual reduction alters the torso mass center of
Page: Getting Started with Scaling
The Scale Tool alters the anthropometry of a model so that it matches a particular subject as closely as possible. Scaling is typically performed by comparing experimental marker data to virtual markers placed on a model. In addition to scaling a model, t
Page: Getting Started with Static Optimization
Static optimization is an extension to inverse dynamics that further resolves the net joint moments into individual muscle forces at each instant in time. The muscle forces are resolved by minimizing the sum of squared (or other power) muscle activations.
Page: Giordano Valente
PhD Candidate in Bioengineering, University of Bologna, Italy Medical Technology Laboratory, Rizzoli Orthopaedic Institute, Bologna, Italy NMS Builder Demo Workshop Goals Slides
Page: Gopalakrishnan, Anantharaman
Page: Graphical User Interface
This chapter introduces the basic components of the OpenSim Graphical User Interface (GUI), including menus, windows, and the toolbar: Next: Menus
Page: Guide to Building Doxygen
Note: These instructions apply for OpenSim versions 3.x Introduction We provide the doxygen online for each release of OpenSim. The version corresponding to the most recent release can be found at https://simtk.org/api_docs/opensim/api_docs/ https://simtk
Page: Guide to OpenSim Workflow and Tools
Overview of the OpenSim Workflow Overview of the OpenSim Workflow Scaling Getting Started with Scaling Inverse Kinematics Getting Started with Inverse Kinematics Inverse Dynamics Getting Started with Inverse Dynamics Static Optimization Getting Started wi
Page: Guide to Using Doxygen
is an automated documentation system for available Classes and methods. This page will introduce you to navigating the online Doxygen pages and orientate you to the structure and language used. Doxygen Navigation doxygen31.png Doxygen Hompage T

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Page: Hands-on Exercise 1
In this exercise you will learn process movement data using the MOtoNMS software tool https://simtk.org/home/motonms. The processed data will then be used to perform inverse kinematics (IK) and inverse dynamics (ID) analysis on a scaled OpenSim musculoske
Page: Hands-on Exercise 2
In this exercise you will learn create a forward dynamics musculoskeletal simulation of upper limb movement. You will first learn to control elbow flexion by prescribing muscle activations to the model's virtual muscles. Then you will learn to add additio
Page: Hardisty & Symons
Michael-Hardisty-OpenSim-Workshop-August2013.pptx
Page: How CMC Works
At user-specified time intervals during a simulation, the CMC tool computes muscle excitation levels that will drive the generalized coordinates (e.g., joint angles) of a dynamic musculoskeletal model towards a desired kinematic trajectory. CMC does this
Page: How Forward Dynamics Works
Musculoskeletal Model Dynamics In contrast to inverse dynamics where the motion of the model was known and we wanted to determine the forces and torques that generated the motion, in forward dynamics, a mathematical model describes how coordinates and th
Page: How IAA Works
The topics covered in this section include: Equations of Motion The equations of motion (EOMs) of an OpenSim model are given by: \left[ M \right] \ddot{q} = G(q) + V(q,\dot{q}\,) + S(q,\dot{q}\,) + \left[ R \right] f where M is the mass matrix, q are th
Page: How Inverse Dynamics Works
The classical equations of motion may be written in the following form: InverseDynamics1.png where N is the number of degrees of freedom; InverseDynamics2.png are the vectors of generalized positions, velocities, and accelerations, respectively; InverseD
Page: How Inverse Kinematics Works
The IK tool goes through each time step (frame) of motion and computes generalized coordinate values which positions the model in a pose that "best matches" experimental marker and coordinate values for that time step. Mathematically, the "best match" is
Page: How Robust is Human Gait to Shortened Calf Muscles?
Study Author Katrina Wisdom Contents Introduction Movement abnormalities, which are symptoms of many neuromuscular diseases and conditions, can be caused by aberrations in one or several of the parameters governing muscle excitation, activation, and mecha
Page: How RRA Works
The topics covered in this section include: Overview Residual reduction is a form of forward dynamics simulation that uses a tracking controller to follow model kinematics determined from the inverse kinematics. Computed muscle control (CMC) serves as the
Page: How Scaling Works
The topics covered in this section include: Overview Scaling is performed based on a combination of measured distances between x-y-z marker locations and manually-specified scale factors. The marker locations are usually obtained using motion capture equi
Page: How Static Optimization Works
As described in Inverse Dynamics, the motion of the model is completely defined by the generalized positions, velocities, and accelerations. The Static Optimization Tool uses the known motion of the model to solve the equations of motion for the unknown g
Page: How to Contribute
There are many ways that you can contribute to the OpenSim project: Help us improve the OpenSim Documentation. See our guide to Contributing to the OpenSim Documentation to learn more. Answer questions on the User Form https://simtk.org/forums/viewforum.p
Page: How to Run an OpenSim Workshop
Define intended audience, topics, and agenda: Beginning vs. Advanced user Will participants bring their own projects and/or work on prepared examples and exercises? Beginning Workshops: Mix lecture, demo, and hands-on example Examples should ideally hav
Page: How to Use IAA
The topics covered in this section include: Command-line Execution The Induced Acceleration Analysis is run using the command analyze -S <setup file name>, for example, analyze -S subject01_Setup_IAA.xml Setup Files and XML Tag Definitions Induced Acceler
Page: How to Use the Analysis Tool
The topics covered in this section include: Overview The Analyze Tool is accessed by selecting Tools -> Analyze… from the OpenSim main menu bar. Like all tools, the operations performed by the Analyze Tool apply to the current model. The name of the curre
Page: How to Use the CMC Tool
How to Use the GUI The computed muscle control tool is accessed by selecting Tools → Computed Muscle Control… from the OpenSim main menu bar (figure below). Like all tools, the operations performed by the computed muscle control tool apply to the current
Page: How to Use the Forward Dynamics Tool
How to Use the GUI The Forward Dynamics Tool is accessed by selecting Tools → Forward Dynamics… from the OpenSim main menu bar. Like all tools, the operations performed by the Forward Dynamics Tool apply to the current model. The name of the current model
Page: How to Use the IK Tool
The topics covered in this section include: How to Use the GUI To launch the IK Tool: ik-1.PNG Select Tools → Inverse Kinematics from the OpenSim main menu bar. The Settings pane is used to specify parameters related to the experimental marker data. The W
Page: How to Use the Inverse Dynamics Tool
The topics covered in this section include: How to Use the GUI The inverse dynamics tool is accessed by selecting Tools → Inverse Dynamics… from the OpenSim main menu bar. Like all tools, the operations performed by the inverse dynamics tool apply to the
Page: How to Use the RRA Tool
The topics covered in this section include: How to Use the GUI The computed muscle control tool is accessed by selecting Tools → Reduce Residuals … from the OpenSim menu. The RRA Tool is governed by three tabs: rraTool.png The Main Settings pane is used
Page: How to Use the Scale Tool
The topics covered in this section include: How to Use the GUI The Scale Tool is accessed by: Select Tools → Scale Model... from the OpenSim main menu bar. You need the model you want to be scale to be current. To learn how to make a model current visit
Page: How to Use the Static Optimization Tool
The topics covered in this section include: How to Use the GUI To launch the Static Optimization Tool, select Static Optimization… from the Tools menu. The Static Optimization Tool dialog window (figure below), like all other OpenSim tools, operates on th
Page: Human Neck Model
The muscles of the neck generate movements of the head and help maintain stability of the cervical spine. We have used quantitative descriptions of muscle architecture and musculoskeletal geometry to develop a biomechanical model of the human neck. The mo
Page: Huseyin Celik

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Page: ICORR Workshop June 2013
The Katherine Steele http://simtk-confluence.stanford.edu:8080/display/~ksteele and Jeff Reinbolt http://simtk-confluence.stanford.edu:8080/display/~reinbolt will lead a hand-on workshop http://depts.washington.edu/uwconf/icorr2013/open_sim_workshop.html
Page: ID Settings Files and XML Tags
The topics covered in this section include: Setup File and XML Tag Definitions The settings file is an XML file whose tags specify properties to be used by OpenSim for the inverse dynamics analysis. The XML tags used are defined in the following sections.
Page: IK Settings Files and XML Tag Definitions
The topics covered in this section include: Inverse Kinematics Setup File There are three properties that need to be specified in an inverse kinematics setup file: The model to which the IK solver is to be applied; The marker and coordinate error weightin
Page: Importing and Exporting SIMM Models
Importing a SIMM Model Models that were created using Musculographics' SIMM (Software for Interactive Musculoskeletal Modeling) toolkit can be imported into OpenSim. To import a SIMM model: importsimm-1.png Select File → Import SIMM Model… from the OpenSi
Page: Induced Acceleration Analysis
The Induced Acceleration Analysis is used to compute accelerations caused or "induced" by individual forces acting on a model, for example, the contribution of individual muscle forces to the mass center acceleration. Typically, induced accelerations of g
Page: Inputs and Outputs for IAA
Inputs and Outputs The inputs for setting up the Analyze Tool consists of (see Analyses http://simtk-confluence.stanford.edu:8080/display/OpenSim/Analyses): OpenSim model [.osim file] (same as input to CMC) External loads [.xml file] applied to the model
Page: Installation Guide
This section covers how to install OpenSim on a computer running one of the following Microsoft® Windows® operating systems: Vista®, XP, Windows 7. Next: Supported Platforms
Page: Installing OpenSim
To install OpenSim you will need to: Exit All Programs Run Installation Program Exit All Programs It is recommended that you exit all programs, especially existing copies of OpenSim, before you run the installation program. Also, you should temporarily di
Page: Interactive Operational-Space Controller for OpenSim
Software Architect Gerald Brantner Contents Project Overview The purpose of this project is the implementation of operational-space control in OpenSim. This kind of controller has a number of advantages over commonly used generalized coordinate (torque) c
Page: Intermediate Examples
Page: International Shoulder Group Workshop 2016
The 11th Conference of the International Shoulder Group (ISG) will be held from 14th-16th July 2016 in Winterthur, Switzerland and will include a half-day OpenSim workshop. The workshop will be led by Dimitra Blana http://www.keele.ac.uk/istm/staff/dimitr
Page: Introducing OpenSim
This chapter gives an overview of the OpenSim software's capabilities and what is included in this user's guide. The topics covered in the section include: Next: Welcome to OpenSim
Page: Introduction to OpenSim for Device Design
OpenSim is an extensible platform for visualizing, manipulating, simulating, and analyzing neuromusculoskeletal models to study the interaction between Warrior Web technologies and the neuromuscular system. OpenSim provides a graphical user interface (GUI
Page: Introduction to the OpenSim API
Before you get started with Scripting or learning how to use the C++ API in the Developer's Guide, you should review this background information: Next: Technical Background Previous: Scripting and Development
Page: Introductory Examples
Page: Inverse Dynamics
In this section we will cover: Getting Started with Inverse Dynamics How Inverse Dynamics Works How to Use the Inverse Dynamics Tool ID Settings Files and XML Tags Next: Getting Started with Inverse Dynamics
Page: Inverse Kinematics
In this section, we provide a conceptual review of the inputs and outputs of the Inverse Kinematics (IK) tool, a set of troubleshooting tips and best practices, as well as how to use the IK tool in OpenSim: Getting Started with Inverse Kinematics How Inve
Page: Inverse Kinematics Tasks for Scale
The topics covered in this section include: The inverse kinematics (IK) tasks file <IKTaskSet> referred to from the main Scale Setup File is shown in the example below. The IK tasks file specifies properties associated with error terms. A brief descriptio
Page: ISB TGCS Workshop 2017
More and more OpenSim users are using the MATLAB scripting interface for research. In this workshop, the OpenSim team will use a hands-on example to introduce the new features of OpenSim 4.0 that make scripting in MATLAB more powerful and user-friendly. T
Page: ISB Tutorial August 2013
The OpenSim team will run a workshop at the XXIV Congress of the International Society of Biomechanics http://www.isbbrazil.com/conteudo/view?ID_CONTEUDO=843 in Natal, Brazil. We invite all ISB participants to take part in the OpenSim Workshop on Sunday A
Page: Ispat_model
iSPAT.osim This is our Ispat model!

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Page: Jacobo Bibliowicz
Workshop Goals Workshop Results
Page: Jason Wheeler
Page: Java Notes
General Preferences are stored in registry on windows, and elsewhere in linux. See this http://www.onjava.com/pub/a/onjava/synd/2001/10/17/j2se.html?page=2. Swing Text fields After a user edits a text field, the new value should be committed in response
Page: Joint Reactions Analysis
The topics covered in this section include: Overview JointReaction is an OpenSim Analysis for calculating resultant forces and moments at joint. Specifically, it calculates the joint forces and moments transferred between consecutive bodies as a result o
Page: Jonkers Team
Page: Juan Leon and Victor Zordan

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Page: Kindt, Thalia
Page: Koen Peeters
Workshop Goals Workshop Final Presentation
Page: Kornbluh & Ziemba
Slide1.jpg Slide2.jpg The following slide shows preliminary data for the exosuit. This data uses our initial guesses to decide when to activate and deactivate each component. The plan moving forward will be to iteratively optimize the timing of the six co
Page: Kugler, Patrick
IMG_0100.jpg I am a researcher in the Digital Sports Group at the Pattern Recognition Lab at the University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Germany. In my research I focus on the mobile analysis of human motion. This includes studies with wearable sensors, modelin

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Page: Leng-feng Lee
Leng-Feng Lee Postdoc, University of Massachusetts Amherst Website: http://people.umass.edu/lengfeng/ http://people.umass.edu/lengfeng/ Workshop Goals
Page: License for OpenSim 3.0 and Later
License: OpenSim GUI The OpenSim Graphical User Interface (GUI) is available in binary form for use in commercial or non-commercial settings provided you acknowledge its use and you do not redistribute the software, as described in the license below: The
Page: Linux Support
Using OpenSim Binaries in Linux You will need to manually set some environment variables in order to compile/run examples/Visualizer. These are: OPENSIM_HOME=/path/to/where/opensim/is/installed LIBRARY_PATH=$OPENSIM_HOME/lib LD_LIBRARY_PATH=$OPENSIM_HOME/
Page: Loading and Saving Models and Motions
This section covers the basics of how to open and save an OpenSim model, how to load a motion into OpenSim, and how to import and export SIMM models within the OpenSim GUI: Next: Opening, Closing, and Saving Models
Page: Loading Motions
See below for information about Opening a Motion To animate a model, load an associated motion file (file type: .mot) into OpenSim. This can be done by drag and drop of the .mot (or .sto) file onto the 3D window of the application, using the File menu as
Page: Lower Extremity Model
We have developed a seven segment, seven degree-of-freedom model of the human lower extremity to examine how surgical changes in musculoskeletal geometry and muscle architecture affect muscle force and its moment about the joints. This model represents a
Page: Lower Limb Model 2010
The Lower Limb Extremity Model 2010 (Arnold 2009) is a three-dimensional computer model of the lower limb extremity that can be examined and analyzed in OpenSim, a freely available biomechanics simulation application. The model includes geometric represen
Page: Luca Modenese
PhD Student at Imperial College London. My initial aims and final achievements are below. Workshop Aims Workshop Achievements

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Page: Manual Scaling Factors
The manual scale factors can be set using the <ScaleSet> and </ScaleSet> tags. <ScaleSet> is a set consisting of <Scale> tags, each of which gives manual scale factors as described below. An example of a manual scaling file is shown below: <scales> Tag Ea
Page: Mark Finch
Page: Marker (.trc) Files
The topics covered in this section include: Overview The .trc (Track Row Column) file format was created by Motion Analysis Corporation to specify the positions of markers placed on a subject at different times during a motion capture trial. An example .t
Page: Marker Editor
The Marker Editor gives you access to the currently selected Marker in the navigator view. Markers are used by the Scale Tool to scale a generic model to fit a particular subject, and by the Inverse Kinematics Tool to solve for coordinate values correspon
Page: McGowan & Gutmann
Website: http://www.webpages.uidaho.edu/McGowanLab/ http://www.webpages.uidaho.edu/McGowanLab/
Page: Measurement-Based Scaling
The topics covered in this section include: The measurement-based scaling set contains pairs of experimental markers, the distance between which are used to scale the generic musculoskeletal model. The experimental measurements used for scaling are specif
Page: Menus
There are five drop-down menus available from the OpenSim main menu bar: File The File drop-down menu includes the following options which allow you to input and output information about models and motions: Menu-1.png Fore more information abo
Page: Millard 2012 Muscle Models
Introduction This page describes the Hill-type muscle models implemented in OpenSim as OpenSim::Millard2012EquilibriumMuscle https://simtk.org/api_docs/opensim/api_docs/classOpenSim_1_1Millard2012EquilibriumMuscle.html by Dr. Matthew Millard and described
Page: Model Editing
An OpenSim model is made up of objects or components, like bodies, joints, and muscles. You can edit most attributes or properties of an OpenSim model and its constituent components live in the GUI. For example, you can edit the mass properties of bodies,
Page: Modeling and Simulation Best Practices
This section contains the following set of documents to help researchers evaluate musculoskeletal models and simulations of their movement: The OpenSim team also has a publication of recommendations for evaluating Models and Simulation; Is My Model Good
Page: Modeling, Evaluation, and Control Optimization of Exosuit with OpenSim
Intro2.png Team Member Jaehyun Bae Contents Motivation This project is motivated by DARPA Warrior Web Program http://www.darpa.mil/Our_Work/DSO/Programs/Warrior_Web.aspx. DARPA.png There has been a lot of research into exoskeletons over the years to allev
Page: Motion (.mot) Files
The topics covered in this section include: Overview The .mot (motion) file format was created by the developers of SIMM (Software for Interactive Musculoskeletal Modeling). The .mot file format is compatible with both SIMM and OpenSim. A .mot file consis
Page: MR-Based Models Lower Extremity Models
We have created models of three lower extremity cadaveric specimens and four subjects with cerebral palsy from MR images. The models characterize the geometry of the pelvis, femur, and proximal tibia, the kinematics of the hip and tibiofemoral joints, and
Page: Mukherjee, Gaurav
Page: Multibody Dynamics Concepts (Simbody)
OpenSim's dynamics capability is based on the open-source Simbody package that is part of SimTK. Simbody is a full-featured, high-performance multibody dynamics toolset using internal coordinates (that is, generalized coordinates relating one body to the
Page: Muscle Editor
The Muscle Editor gives you access to all of the parameters of the muscles and other actuators in the model. The paths of the muscles can be altered by selecting and moving attachment points in the 3D View window, and the force-generating parameters can b
Page: Muscle Model Theory and Publications
The following sections contain more information about each of the muscle models included in OpenSim: These models are described in more detail in the following references: Millard, M., Uchida, T., Seth, A., Delp, S.L. (2013) Flexing computational muscle:
Page: Musculoskeletal Models
Just as interactive graphics have enhanced engineering analysis and design, graphics-based musculoskeletal models are effective tools for visualizing human movement, analyzing the functional capacity of muscles, and designing improved surgical procedures.

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Page: NASA Digital Astronaut Project
Page: Navigating the 3D View Window
orbyThe topics in this section include: Navigating the 3D View Window Each OpenSim 3D View window is a VTK window. VTK is an open source visualization package distributed by Kitware Inc. (www.kitware.com http://www.kitware.com). VTK windows come with a bu
Page: Navigator Tree Nodes
The tree displayed in the Navigator window has nodes of many different types. Nodes can represent 1) a single object in the model or associated with the model or 2) collections of objects (for example, the node corresponding to the set of rigid bodies in
Page: Navigator Window
The Navigator window shows you the set of models that have been loaded into OpenSim, along with their associated objects (such as motions), in a hierarchical, or tree, representation. Topics covered in this section include: Opening, Closing, and Using th
Page: Netbeans UI
NetBeans UI General Definitions Component: a top component such as our explorer (navigator), coordinate viewer, messages window, etc. Mode: Defines a region of the application's split desktop which can contain a component. Mode type: Can be editor (AK
Page: New Features in OpenSim 3.0
OpenSim 3.0 is our biggest upgrade to-date. We've added new features, including live model editing, scripting in Matlab and the OpenSim application, and improved muscle models. We've enhanced some of the core existing OpenSim functionality, including our
Page: New Features in OpenSim 3.1
In OpenSim 3.1 https://simtk.org/project/xml/downloads.xml?group_id=91, we've focused on improving the OpenSim scripting interface, accessible through the Graphical User Interface (GUI) and Matlab. We've also added to the OpenSim modeling and simulation l
Page: New Features in OpenSim 3.2
In OpenSim 3.2 https://simtk.org/project/xml/downloads.xml?group_id=91, we've focused on improving the OpenSim scripting interface, accessible through the Graphical User Interface (GUI), Matlab, and now Python. We've also added new visualization capabilit
Page: New Features in OpenSim 3.3
In OpenSim 3.3, we've focused on improving and fixing bugs in static optimization and ligament scaling. Additional scripts, examples and several other bug fixes are also included. More details about these changes and more are described below. Improvements
Page: Node Commands (Context Menus)
This section describes the commands that are accessible through the different tree nodes. You can select the commands by right-mouse-clicking on a tree node to bring up the associated context menu. Since multiple nodes, potentially representing objects o
Page: Numbers and Constants in SimTK
SimTK supports both float (single) and double precision, and is compiled with one of those as its default, which is then referred to in SimTK as type Real. SimTK::Real is simply a typedef to either the built-in float or double type. OpenSim always uses do

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Page: Object-Specific Commands
The following Object-Specific Commands are available: Model Node When a model is loaded into OpenSim, OpenSim creates a tree representing the objects comprising this model and adds it to the existing tree displayed in the Navigator window. The node for th
Page: Open Source Tools for Biomechanics Sep 2016
The OpenSim team, led by Chris Dembia of Stanford University, participated in a one-day course http://ieeeboston.org/open-source-tools-computational-biomechanics/ on open-source software for biomechanics, organized by Kevin Moerman at the MIT Media Lab. A
Page: Opening and Restoring Excitation Editor
The topics covered in this section include: Opening the Excitation Editor Window The Excitation Editor allows the display and editing of muscle excitations and other control waveforms. In this example, the muscle excitations are organized into two columns
Page: Opening, Closing, and Saving Models
The sections below described how to: Opening a Model There are several ways to open a musculoskeletal model written in the OpenSim format (file type: .osim), described in the sections below: From the File Menu you could either drag the file from the Windo
Page: Opening, Closing, and Using the Navigator Window
The Navigator window shows you the set of models that have been loaded into OpenSim, along with their associated objects (such as motions), in a hierarchical, or tree, representation. This is particularly useful for large biomechanical models, which would
Page: OpenSim 3.0.1 Release Notes
OpenSim 3.0.1 includes improved scripting functionality, new examples, and several bug fixes, in addition to all of the New Features in OpenSim 3.0: If you're currently using OpenSim 3.0, you should be able to update with no major changes to your workflow
Page: OpenSim and NCSRR Logos
OpenSim and NCSRR Logos: Note: Several of the images below are intended for a black background and thus don't display correctly on the white background below (e.g. OpenSimLogoBlackHorizontal.png).
Page: OpenSim Coding Standards
Note: This page is under construction and soon will move to GitHub https://github.com/opensim-org/opensim-core. Page Contributors: Michael Sherman, Ayman Habib, Jen Hicks Header Guards Header Guards are the lines like: #ifndef _PropertyTable_h_ // <-- d
Page: OpenSim Featured in Talks at ISB 2015
At the 2015 International Symposium on Computer Simulation in Biomechanics (TGCS) and the Congress of the International Society for Biomechanics (ISB), OpenSim was mentioned or used in over 60 of the abstracts. Here's a list of those abstracts. OpenSim re
Page: OpenSim Fellows
The goal of the OpenSim Fellows Program http://www.stanford.edu/group/opensim/support/fellows.html is to cultivate and engage a community of OpenSim experts who will collectively advance the field of neuro-musculoskeletal modeling and simulation. We encou
Page: OpenSim Models
The topics covered in this section include: You can also find more information in the Example - Model Editing. Use the OpenSim GUI's XML Browser, under Help to find the XML mark-up for any OpenSim model component described below. Overview An OpenSim model
Page: OpenSim Project Roadmap
The OpenSim and NCSRR team has an ambitious set of plans for 2013 and beyond. Here's what's coming: Community, Outreach, and Education An Official Network of OpenSim Experts. The number of modeling and simulation experts in the world is rapidly growing. W
Home page: OpenSim Support
Welcome to the Support Portal for OpenSim 3.0.
Page: OpenSim Workshop Bologna 2016
Logo Workshop2.png OpenSim experts Friedl De Groote (KU Leuven), Ilse Jonkers (KU Leuven), Luca Modenese (University of Sheffield), Massimo Sartori (University Medical Center Goettingen), Giordano Valente (Rizzoli Orthopaedic Institute) and Mariska We
Page: OpenSim Workshop Leuven 2015
Several OpenSim Fellows, including Ilse Jonkers, Friedl De Groote, Massimo Sartori, Marjolein van der Krogt and Giordano Valente, are organizing an OpenSim workshop in Leuven, Belgium. IMG_0840.JPG SURVEY https://nl.surveymonkey.com/s/3WY7C6M https://nl.s
Page: OpenSim Workshop Leuven 2017
OpenSim Fellows Friedl De Groote (KU Leuven), Ilse Jonkers (KU Leuven), Massimo Sartori (University Medical Center Goettingen), Giordano Valente (Rizzoli Orthopaedic Institute), Mariska Wesseling (KU Leuven) and Dimitra Blana (Keele University, UK) are or
Page: OpenSim's Capabilities
The OpenSim software platform has a broad set of capabilities, features and benefits. With OpenSim, you can: Create and Edit Models Full-Featured and Flexible Modeling Platform. OpenSim allows you to build models of a broad range of musculoskeletal struct
Page: Operational-Space Controller API Tutorial
In this tutorial, we add an operational-space controller to an existing OpenSim model and use the keyboard to interact with the simulation. Set up an example model Download the Full Body Model from https://simtk.org/project/xml/downloads.xml?group_id=516
Page: Optimizers
Optimizers Algorithms Ipopt https://projects.coin-or.org/Ipopt Algorithm paper is here http://www.research.ibm.com/people/a/andreasw/papers/ipopt.pdf and here http://www.optimization-online.org/DB_FILE/2004/03/836.pdf CFSQP lmdif LAPACK - supports line
Page: Overview of the OpenSim Workflow
OpenSim has a broad range of capabilities for generating and analyzing musculoskeletal models and dynamic simulations. This chapter provides an overview of these capabilities and a list of resources to find more information about each component of the Ope

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Page: Part I: Cat Modeling
The first task is to develop models whose actuation we can then optimize for the flip maneuver. We walk through the code in modeling.cpp, which becomes an executable that creates two cat models. The first model is simply two segments connected by a 2-degr
Page: Part I: Leg Muscle Force Estimation in Swing
All example files are included in the Model folder "Leg6Dof9Musc" included with the OpenSim installation. Model _Leg69 A. Explore the model and the Forward Dynamics Tool Objective: Visualize an inverse kinematic solution of the swing phase using the OpenS
Page: Part I: Setting Up Your Development Environment
A. Create and compile the example project in the developer's guide In the Getting Started as a Developer section of the Developer's Guide, read the following three pages: Technical Background Prerequisites Step-by-Step Example Following the instructions i
Page: Part II: Building a Passive Dynamic Walker Model
A. Add Bodies to the Model In this section, you will add the platform, the pelvis, and the thigh and shank segments to the model. Setup There are several functions in the SimTK library that can help you as you begin to write your code. The default units
Page: Part II: Dynamic Optimization of Control Strategy
To get our models to "right themselves", we control their actuation and tweak this control until we obtain a flipping motion. We have an optimization algorithm take care of the tweaking for us. During each step of the optimization, the algorithm tweaks th
Page: Part II: Leg Muscle Force Estimation in Stance
A. Find a set of generalized forces that produce the stance motion using Inverse Dynamics Before you begin working on stance, make sure to unlock the three pelvis coordinates (pelvis_tilt, pelvis_tx, pelvis_ty) that were locked for the swing analysis. Ob
Page: Patrick Aubin and Hao Pei
Page: Performing a Simulation
Overview In this chapter, we will write a main program to perform a forward dynamic simulation using the OpenSim API. We will build it up in pieces, starting from the simplest possible OpenSim model, a single block experiencing the force of gravity. In th
Page: Performing a Simulation Part Four
The steps covered in part four are: Add a Prescribed Force To push the block during the tug-of-war, we create a prescribed force to apply to the block. The prescribed force is applied in the x-direction in the block body's frame. The point of application
Page: Performing a Simulation Part One
The steps in part one are: Create an OpenSim Model To perform a simulation, we first create an OpenSim model and set its name in our main program. #include <OpenSim/OpenSim.h> using namespace OpenSim; int main() { try { // Create an OpenSim model and set
Page: Performing a Simulation Part Three
The steps covered in part three are: Add Two Opposing Muscles To prevent the block from falling through the ground, we create two opposing muscles between the ground and block. Note that this must be done before the call to initSystem, or else the muscles
Page: Performing a Simulation Part Two
The steps covered in part two are: Initialize the OpenSim Model System and Get the State An OpenSim model is backed by a SimTK::System (see Chapter 5), which actually performs the computations. As such, the model itself is a stateless object with the stat
Page: Plot Summary Panel
The topics covered in this section include: The plot panel is the top part of the Plotter Window and includes the drawing area, title, legend, and axis labels shown in the section on the Plot Window. Customization of this area is done through a pop-up men
Page: Plot Window
Opening and Closing the Plotter Window To open/close the Plotter window: plot-1.PNG To open: select Tools ->Plot… from the OpenSim main menu bar. This brings up a blank Plotter window. An example of the plotter (with data) is shown on the left. Multiple
Page: Plotting
The plot tool allows you to run a set of standard analyses on a model and plot the results either for visual inspection within OpenSim or to export the results into other applications. In addition to plotting quantities, the tool also allows you to print
Page: Point Kinematics Example
In this example we run the Analyze Tool to compute the trajectory of a point on a body. The attached zip file contains: double_pendulum.osim: A model of a pendulum with two links double_pendulum_run.sto: Output from running the forward tool on the model
Page: PP slide
RyanBakkerWorkshopGoals2.ppt
Page: Pre-Processing Delaware Data
Pre-Processing Delaware Data These are Eran's notes so far... Chand John also has a lot of notes on this which hopefully can be incorporated here. Coordinate Systems To transform between coordinate systems, use e.g. transform_trcFile('SS_walking1_smo
Page: Preparing Your Data
This chapter describes the formats for data files that can be imported into OpenSim. Generally, you must input the following types of data into OpenSim to generate simulations: Marker trajectories Ground reaction forces and moments and centers of pressure
Page: Prerequisites
The topics covered in this section include: Overview The requirements and examples in this guide are targeted for users running Windows or Mac OSX with Windows BootCamp or VMWare since the OpenSim application and libraries are built for Windows. (Note, f
Page: Previewing Motion Capture (Mocap) Data
Motion capture data can be previewed in OpenSim to verify that preprocessing was done correctly and that data is in agreement with the intended model. See Preparing Your Data for more information about how to import your data into OpenSim. In some cases,
Page: Probes
Introduction to OpenSim Probes Probes are model components that perform vector measurements on an OpenSim model during a simulation. These measurements can then be output to an external file using a ProbeReporter analysis. This is a valuable new feature o
Page: Property Editor
The Property Editor is a generic, streamlined editor for the objects that make up an OpenSim model (bodies, joints, muscles, etc.). This page describes: What is a model property? OpenSim models and objects are defined by a set of Properties. For example,
Page: Pulling Out the Stops: Designing a Muscle for a Tug-of-War Competition
Objective The force-producing properties of muscle are complex, highly nonlinear, and can have substantial effects on movement (see McMahon, 1984 for a review). For simplicity, lumped-parameter, dimensionless muscle models that are capable of representing

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Page: Questions: Building a Passive Dynamic Walker Model
Reflection Provide some suggestions for future offerings of the course: Were any elements of this lab confusing? How could they be improved? What resources did you use? Was anything missing or unclear in the OpenSim documentation? What was the best part o
Page: Questions: Leg Muscle Force Estimation
If you are completing this example as a laboratory exercise for a course on human movement, you will need to submit answers to these questions. These questions can be saved as a Word document by selecting "Export to Word" from the Tools menu in the top-ri
Page: Questions: Muscle Design for Tug-of-War
A. Explore and edit OpenSim model, storage, and controls files How many degrees of freedom are in the Tug_of_War_Millard.osim model? What are they? What are the values of the four primary muscle parameters (maximum isometric force, optimal fiber length, t
Page: Questions: Optimal Jump Performance
If you are completing this example as a laboratory exercise for a course on human movement, you will need to submit answers to these questions. These questions can be saved as a Word document by selecting "Export to Word" from the Tools menu in the top-ri

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Page: Ramanathan, Raghu
Page: Release History
Previous Releases v3.3 released on Jul. 2, 2015 v3.2 released on Mar. 5, 2014 v3.1 released on May 28, 2013 v3.0.1 released on Mar. 27, 2013 v3.0, release on Oct. 26, 2012 v2.4, released on on Oct. 10, 2011 v2.2.1, released on Apr. 7, 2011 v2.2.0, release
Page: Repository Layout
The subversion repository The subversion repository of OpenSim has the following layout: - Trunk: Work in progress, bleeding edge but comes at a price since it's constantly changing. If not one of the full time developers please contact either Ayman or
Page: Residual Reduction Algorithm
The topics covered in this section are: Getting Started with RRA How RRA Works How to Use the RRA Tool Settings Files and XML Tag Definitions Next: Getting Started with RRA
Page: Rha, Dong-Wook
Associate professor (specialty in Pediatric Physiatrist) Department and Research Institute of Rehabilitation Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea Severance rehabilitation hospital, Seoul, Korea Email: rehabkr@gmail.com
Page: Riutta, Stephen
sdriutta at utexas.edu
Page: RRA and CMC Theory and Publications
Theory Notes on RRA and CMC RRA COM Adjustment Calculations Notes by Chand John on the back-of-the-envelope calculations RRA uses to adjust the mass center of a model ISOBME 2006 Taiwan Abstract on RRA A conference abstract by Frank Anderson, et al. Gene
Page: Running OpenSim
You can begin using OpenSim immediately after installation. To launch OpenSim: install-1-2.png Go to the folder you chose for the OpenSim shortcuts (e.g., All Programs > OpenSim). Click on the icon for OpenSim. Next: Updating OpenSim Previous: Installing
Page: Running OpenSim on Mac OS X or Linux using a Windows Virtual Machine
You can run OpenSim on non-Windows computers through a virtual machine (VM). Requirements The purpose of running a virtual machine is to simulate a Windows environment on non-Windows computers. In order for that to happen you will need two things: Virtual

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Page: Sample Responses - Defining your Research Goals for the Model
What results do I need to answer my research question? Joint angles Net joint moments Muscle forces Muscle fiber lengths Predicted control signal What elements of a model might these results be sensitive to? I am interested in muscle fiber length in the p
Page: Scale Marker File
The topics covered in this section include: The scale marker file contains a list of the virtual markers that are placed on the body segments of the model. An example of a marker file is shown below. Example: XML file for a scale marker file <?xml version
Page: Scale Setup File
The topics covered in this section include: There are 5 major sections to a scale setup file: execution parameters; subject-specific parameters (e.g., mass, height, age); parameters related to the generic model to scale; scaling properties; and marker pla
Page: Scaling
In this section, we provide a conceptual review of the inputs and outputs of the Scale tool and a set of troubleshooting tips and best practices for scaling. Carefully scaling your model to match your subject is essential for getting good results from lat
Page: Scripting
Scripting Environments OpenSim's scripting capability allows users to: Perform batch processing of common workflows Utilize the OpenSim API without the overhead of learning to program in C++ and setting up a development environment You can access OpenSim
Page: Scripting and Development
Note: This section is currently undergoing updates and changes. Please bear with us as we improve the OpenSim documentation. OpenSim provides several mechanisms for extending its existing capabilities by either adding new model elements, computing new q
Page: Scripting in Python
Python wrapping is available from OpenSim 3.2, onward. The system architecture of Python & OpenSim must match (install 64-bit Python and 64-bit OpenSim) Python setup and configuration instructions are below. Introduction to Python Python is a widely used
Page: Scripting in the GUI
As of version 3.0, OpenSim comes with a built in scripting shell that allows user access to the OpenSim API for loading, editing, and building models, running tools, plotting results, and more. The syntax for the scripting shell in the GUI is Python. Wh
Page: Scripting with Matlab
The system architecture of Matlab & OpenSim must match (install 64-bit OpenSim if you use 64-bit Matlab). Matlab setup and configuration instructions are below. When referring to indexed elements remember that Matlab begins indexing at 1 while OpenSim dat
Page: Selection Filtering Window
When you press the Muscles… button from the curve creation panel, the dialog window shown below in Selection Filtering Window is displayed. This window is used in many places throughout OpenSim and allows users to select from a potentially long list of na
Page: Settings Files and XML Tag Definitions
The settings files are XML files whose tags specify properties to be used by OpenSim for performing the residual reduction. The tags used for each type of settings file are defined in the following sections: RRA Setup File A setup file provides the high-l
Page: SimTK Basics
The topics covered in this section include: Overview The OpenSim API uses the Simbios "simulation toolkit" SimTK as its low-level, domain-independent computational layer. Some familiarity with SimTK is required to use the OpenSim API because some of the S
Page: SimTK Simulation Concepts
The figure below shows the primary objects involved in computational simulation of a physical system in SimTK: System, State, and Study. OpenSim creates and manages specific objects of these types that are suitable for the domain of neuromuscular biomecha
Page: Simulation with OpenSim - Best Practices
Overview There is no scientific consensus on when a simulation is "good enough". Ultimately, you need to be sure you are asking the right question (such as “which muscles can contribute to knee flexion in this posture?”) and that your results are robust
Page: Simulation-Based Design to Prevent Ankle Injuries
All example files are included in the Model folder "ToyDropLanding" included with the OpenSim installation. Overview The purpose of this exercise is to use OpenSim to evaluate the risk of injury during landing and to design assistive devices to prevent in
Page: Simulation-Based Design to Reduce Metabolic Cost
Overview The purpose of this exercise is to demonstrate how the OpenSim software platform can be used to design and evaluate devices to assist locomotion. You will work with a simplified model of the musculoskeletal system and a simulation of a typical, u
Page: Site Index
Page: Sky High: Coordinating Muscles for Optimal Jump Performance
Objectives In the study of human movement, experimental measurement is generally limited to the kinematics of the body segments, external reaction forces, and electromyographic (EMG) signals. While these data are essential for characterizing movement, imp
Page: Sky Higher: Dynamic Optimization of Maximum Jump Height
Team Members Carmichael Ong http://simtk-confluence.stanford.edu:8080/display/%7Eongcf Matt Titchenal http://simtk-confluence.stanford.edu:8080/users/viewmyprofile.action Contents Acknowledgements The idea for this project stemmed from the laboratory exer
Page: Slavens, Brooke
Page: Snapshots and Movies
Exporting models as images and animated movies easily is an important part of a modeling and simulation environment. OpenSim provides this capability, enabling the creation of snapshot images and custom movies with a click of a button. This chapter cover
Page: Soccer Kick Example
This examples is for students and educators interested in how elements of a musculoskeletal model come together to generate simulations of human movement. The soccer kick is meant to be compelling, challenging, and fun, allowing students to experiment
Page: Specifying External Loads in Tutorial 3
OpenSim 2.4 has a new process for applying external loads that is more flexible, but requires an additional set-up step. The External Loads setup file (subject01_walk1_grf.xml) needed in the Inverse Dynamics section of Tutorial 3 can be generated using th
Page: SSNR-2014 Neuromusculoskeletal Modeling Workshop, September 2014
This hands-on workshop is held at the Summer School on Neurorehabilitation Engineering http://www.ssnr2014.org/ (September 14-19, 2014, Baiona, Spain). In this hands-on workshop, participants will be introduced to the theory behind simulation of musculosk
Page: SSNR2013 Neuromusculoskeletal Modeling Workshop September 2013
This hands-on workshop is held at the Summer School on Neurorehabilitation Engineering for Clinical Practice http://www.ssnr2013.org (September 15-20, 2013, Elche, Spain). The workshop will introduce novel neuromusculoskeletal modeling methodologies that
Page: Stanford and NCSRR Teaching Materials
Contributors and Acknowledgements These workshop materials were developed by members of the Neuromuscular Biomechanics Lab in the Department of Bioengineering at Stanford University, including Scott Delp, Ajay Seth, Jennifer Hicks, Ayman Habib, Jeff Reinb
Page: Static Optimization
In this section we will cover: Getting Started with Static Optimization How Static Optimization Works How to Use the Static Optimization Tool Static Optimization Settings Files and XML Tags Next: Getting Started with Static Optimization
Page: Static Optimization Settings Files and XML Tags
The topics covered in this section include: Setup File and XML Tag Definitions The settings file is an XML file whose tags specify properties to be used by OpenSim for the static optimization analysis. The XML tags used are defined in the following sectio
Page: Step-by-Step Example
In this first example, you will go step-by-step through the entire process of setting up your build folder using CMake, opening and viewing the C++ code in Visual Studio, compiling your first executable, running it and viewing the results in OpenSim. The
Page: Storage (.sto) Files
The .sto file format was created by the developers of OpenSim. It is very similar to the .mot file format, with two main differences: The time values in the time column of a .sto file do not have to be uniformly spaced The first column of a .sto file must
Page: Supported Platforms
System Requirements The minimum requirements to run the OpenSim GUI: Operating System: Microsoft Windows XP Professional SP3/Vista SP1/Windows 7 Professional Processor: 800MHz Intel Pentium III or equivalent Memory: 512 MB Hard disk space: 500 MB Supporte
Page: SWIG basics
How to wrap classes using SWIG and why? If you develop a new piece of functionality, using the OpenSim API to build a new model component (e.g. Muscle, Actuator, Controller or Probe) you need to decide if you want to make this component available publicl

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Page: Taking Snapshots and Making Movies
The topics covered in this section are: Taking a Snapshot To save the current view as an image: movie-1.PNG Click the camera button http://simtk-confluence.stanford.edu:8080/download/attachments/1443016/worddav911f51f8b7974834d8dbe8da21449c19.png?versio
Page: Teaching Materials
Overview The goal of this section is to compile the OpenSim teaching materials developed by researchers and educators at Stanford and other institutions: Stanford and NCSRR Teaching Materials How to Run an OpenSim Workshop Jeff Reinbolt's Course on Modeli
Page: Technical Background
The topics covered in this section include: What is an API? An application programming interface (API) is a particular set of rules ('code') and specifications that software programs can follow to communicate with each other. It serves as an interface bet
Page: The OpenSim API
Organization of the OpenSim API OpenSim is built on the computational and simulation core provided by SimTK . This core includes low-level, efficient math and matrix algebra libraries, such as LAPACK, as well as the infrastructure for defining a dynamic S
Page: The Strength of Simulation: Estimating Leg Muscle Forces in Stance and Swing
Introduction OpenSim is a freely-available, user-extensible software system for developing musculoskeletal models and for simulating and analyzing movement. By creating dynamic simulations of movement that combine anatomical models with the physics of the
Page: Thelen 2003 Muscle Model
Introduction This page is a description of a Hill-type muscle model implemented in OpenSim that is based on the work of Thelen (2003). The model was modified by Matt Millard, Ajay Seth, and Peter Loan, and it is implemented in OpenSim as OpenSim::Thelen20
Page: Theory and Publications
Page: Toolbar
The information about the OpenSim toolbar covered in this section includes: Parts of the OpenSim Toolbar The toolbar is located at the top of the GUI and contains the model drop down menu, the motion textbox, the motion slider, and the video controls. The
Page: Tools for Preparing Motion Data
Below is a list of available packages made available by members of the OpenSim community to convert experimental data into OpenSim format. In using these utilities we ask that you respect the hard work of your fellow researchers by citing their work appro
Page: Tsai, Liang-Ching
Page: Tutorial 1 - Intro to Musculoskeletal Modeling
The tutorial below is designed for use with OpenSim version 3.2 and later. If you're using an earlier version (3.0 or 3.1), please use this pdf. I. Objectives Introduction to OpenSim Models of the musculoskeletal system enable one to study neuromuscular c
Page: Tutorial 2 - Simulation and Analysis of a Tendon Transfer Surgery
I. Objectives Purpose The purpose of this tutorial is to demonstrate how musculoskeletal models can be used to study orthopaedic surgical techniques and to illustrate how muscle moment arm, optimal muscle fiber length, and tendon slack length influence th
Page: Tutorial 3 - Scaling, Inverse Kinematics, and Inverse Dynamics
I. Objectives Purpose The purpose of this tutorial is to demonstrate how OpenSim solves an inverse kinematics problem and an inverse dynamics problem using experimental data. To diagnose movement disorders and study human movement, biomechanists frequentl
Page: Tutorial: Studying the Cat-Righting Reflex
The cat-righting reflex is a fun problem to study, but also lends itself well to learning many of the abilities of OpenSim. In this tutorial, we walk through code that can be used to generate results similar to those from two of the simulations in the Res
Page: Tyrannosaurus Rex Model
We created a musculoskeletal model of the Tyrannosaurus Rex lower extremity that includes 10 degrees of joint freedom (flexion/extension, ab/adduction, and medial/lateral rotation) and 33 main muscle groups crossing the hip, knee, ankle, and toe joints of

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Page: Updating OpenSim
updateIcon.PNG As of OpenSim 3.2, we added the capacity to push updated to the OpenSim application to our users. When an update becomes available, you will see a pop-up window at the bottom right of your screen. You can also check for updates manually by
Page: Upgrade Notes for OpenSim 3.0
Installation and Setup The installation process for OpenSim 3.0 are very similar to earlier installations. One main difference between version 3.0 and earlier versions (on Windows) is that the application is now launched from an executable rather than fro
Page: Upgrade Notes for OpenSim 3.1
Users can upgrade to OpenSim 3.1 from OpenSim 3.0 without any major changes to their models or simulation workflows. A few upgrade notes for users: 1) If you are using Matlab scripting, you will need to re-run the set-up process to direct Matlab to the ap
Page: Upgrade Notes for OpenSim 3.2
Most users should be able to upgrade to OpenSim 3.2 from OpenSim 3.0 or 3.1 without any major changes to their models or simulation workflows. A few upgrade notes for users: 1) If you are using Matlab scripting, you will need to re-run the set-up process
Page: Upgrade Notes for OpenSim 3.3
Upgrading to OpenSim 3.3 from OpenSim 3.2 should require minimal changes to models and workflows: Users scaling models with ligaments should note that these components will now automatically be scaled and will no longer need special handling. Users runnin
Page: Upper Extremity Model
We have developed a model of the upper extremity that includes 15 degrees of freedom representing the shoulder, elbow, forearm, wrist, thumb, and index finger, and 50 muscle compartments crossing these joints. The kinematics of each joint and the force-ge
Page: User Preferences
You can alter display preferences for the 3D View window and other parameters in the GUI. Preference-1.png Selecting Edit → Preferences… from the main OpenSim menu bar. In the Preferences window that appears, double click on the value of the option you
Page: User's Guide
OpenSimLogoImage.jpg Welcome to the OpenSim User's Guide! To begin learning more about how to use the OpenSim software, step through the pages in this user guide. The chapters are listed below. Or if you know what you would like to read about, use the sea
Page: Using Plugins
Plugins allow you to extend the functionality of OpenSim with new analyses and model components. A plugin comes in the form of a dynamically loaded library (.dll on Windows platform, .dylib on MAC, .so on Linux). It is straightforward to use a plugin tha
Page: Using the API Visualizer
Available in 3.0: For the most basic visualization, all you need to do is call the Model method setUseVisualizer() prior to calling initSystem(): Model myModel; myModel.setUseVisualizer(true); // usual stuff ... myModel.initSystem(); This should result i

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Page: Van Caekenberghe, Ine
Ine Van Caekenberghe ine.vancaekenberghe@ugent.be mailto:ine.vancaekenberghe@ugent.be Ghent University Department of Movement and Sports Sciences Watersportlaan 2 B-9000 Gent BELGIUM WorkshopGoal_IneVanCaekenberghe.ppt
Page: Vasavada Team
Page: Vectors and Matrices
The topics covered in this section include: Overview SimTK has two different sets of classes for vector and matrix objects. You have seen types Vec3 (a 3-vector) and Vector (a variable-length vector) in OpenSim examples. Here we will discuss those in more
Page: Verification and Validation of the OpenSim Software Package
We are constantly testing the OpenSim software to verify that our algorithms are producing physically accurate results and that changes and updates don't change simulation results in unexpected ways. All of these tests must pass before a new version of Op
Page: Video Gallery
Below are video tutorials on the following sections: Introduction video pending Graphical User Interface video pending Scaling Set up: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V5f7OMkfRBs&list=PLFECE3229007D54F6&feature=plcp&context=C3deccf5FDOEgsToPDskJ9Z_urBZkIuw
Page: Virtual Workshop April 2016
The Virtual Workshop will bring together a group of international scholars and OpenSim experts to help each other advance their research using modeling and simulation. The OpenSim team at Stanford University will provide guidance on your projects, while a
Page: Virtual Workshop October 2016
The Virtual Workshop will bring together a group of international scholars and OpenSim experts to help each other advance their research using modeling and simulation. The OpenSim team at Stanford University will provide guidance on your projects, while a
Page: VTK and JOGL
VTK and JOGL Switching from VTK to JOGL Need to implement: trackball tumbling, zoom, translation, etc. bounding boxes dragging objects save to AVI switches for different shading modes, and show/hide objects changing color, transparency need back to fro

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Page: Walker, David
Page: Warrior Web Wiki
The Warrior Web Wiki includes the following resources: Return to the Warrior Web SimTK Project Page https://simtk.org/home/opensim_ww
Page: Warrior Web Workshop May 2013
This workshop covers designing and evaluating assistive devices in OpenSim. The workshop is an opportunity to learn more about how OpenSim works "under the hood" and get supervised, hands-on assistance with projects participants bring to the workshop. On
Page: Welcome to OpenSim
This page provides an introduction to the capabilities and features of OpenSim and how to get started: What is OpenSim? http://simtk-confluence.stanford.edu:8080/display/OpenSim/Introducing+OpenSim#IntroducingOpenSim-WhatisOpenSim Capabilities http://simt
Page: What's New in OpenSim 3.0?
OpenSim 3.0 is our biggest upgrade to-date. We've added new features, including live model editing, scripting in Matlab and the GUI, and improved muscle models. We've enhanced some of the core existing OpenSim functionality, including our muscle models, t
Page: What's New in OpenSim 3.1?
OpenSim 3.1 includes expanded scripting capabilities, enhancements to the graphical user interface, many new modeling components, new examples, and important bug fixes. Read more about the new features we've added for OpenSim 3.1 and find information abou
Page: What's New in OpenSim 3.2?
OpenSim 3.2 includes expanded scripting capabilities, enhancements to the graphical user interface, including auto-updates, plus new examples, and important bug fixes. Read more about the new features we've added for OpenSim 3.2 and find information about
Page: What's New in OpenSim 3.3?
OpenSim 3.3 has fixes and enhancements to Static Optimization and the Scale Tool, improvements to the Metabolic models in OpenSim, along with several other bug fixes and compatibility with Visual Studio 2013 and the Visual Studio 2015 Release Candidate. R
Page: What’s Covered in this Manual
Organization of the User's Guide This manual is organized into four sections. The first section covers installation of OpenSim. The next section describes how to use the basic components of the OpenSim graphical user interface (GUI). The third section cov
Page: Windows
This section contains information about the four parts of the OpenSim window and one topic on formatting: Parts of the OpenSim Window Window-1.png For more information on the View Window visit View Window For more information on the Navigator Window vis
Page: Working with Static Optimization
This Tutorial is for use with OpenSim 3.3 and above. Please refer to the OpenSim Download page https://simtk.org/project/xml/downloads.xml?group_id=91 to get the required version. Overview Static Optimization is a method for estimating muscle activations
Page: Workshop Locations
Francis C. Arrillaga Alumni Center Stanford University 326 Galvez St., 1st Floor Barnes-McDowell-Cranston Conference Rooms https://www.google.com/maps/place/Stanford+Alumni+Association/@37.4306738,-122.1670128,17z/data=!3m1!4b1!4m5!3m4!1s0x808fbb28416493a
Page: Workshops
Check out slides, examples and projects from our past workshops:
Page: Workshops March 2012 and Earlier
MARCH 2012: ADVANCED USER AND DEVELOPER WORKSHOP https://simtk.org/home/opensimws_mar12 From March 20-21, 2011 20 researchers from around the world participated in an OpenSim workshop for advanced users and developers on the Stanford University campus. Th

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Page: Yusuke Okita
PhD student of Physical Therapy from Kyoto University, Japan Workshop Goals What to analyze: Gait of patients after thigh muscle resection for soft tissue sarcoma Expecting impact: The knowledge which would be got from this study enables effective train

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Page: Zach Lerner

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